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The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
Letter from Joshua Lederberg to Kimball and Barbara Atwood Annotation pdf (198,364 Bytes) ocr (4,595 Bytes)
Letter from Joshua Lederberg to Kimball and Barbara Atwood
Number of Image Pages:
2 (198,364 Bytes)
Date:
1957-09-13 (September 13, 1957)
Creator:
Lederberg, Joshua
Recipient:
Atwood, Barbara
Atwood, Kimball
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: Correspondence C
Box Number: 8
Folder Number: 179
Unique Identifier:
BBACFW
Accession Number:
5
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1935-2002
SubSeries: 1953-1960
Folder: Atwood, Kimball
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2005-06-14
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples

Annotation by Joshua Lederberg:
KW: Burnet; Australia; influenza virus research;
possibly first reference to clonal selection theory;
                              Bacteriology Department
                                   Melbourne University
                                   Carlton N3, Vic.,
                                      Australia

                                   September 13, 1957

Dear Kim and Barbee: [Atwood]  ....

..... Since the beginning of the month, we have been settled here
in Melbourne, and I have actually been getting down to some
experimental work here at Burnet's institute.  His own interests
are veering rather sharply towards somatic genetics and the
mechanism of antibody production he is toying now with the idea,
for example, that the antibody response is the selective increase
of one particular species of lymphocyte which already exists (and
accounts for 'natural antibody').  My own predilections are for a
subcellular dynamics.  The hard nut to crack is how induced
tolerance achieves the loss of potency to produce a given antibody
on the part of every cell in the treated host, without the presence
of a humoral factor.  Burnet would account for this by the prenatal
suppression of the corresponding clone of cells, which is quite a
clever notion.  I haven't been able to formulate a better one that
doesn't conflict with the facts, especially since neither induced
tolerance, nor the lack of it, seems to be passively transmissible.
>>>>>>>>;

 Bowers

travelogue;
U-Wis appointment moving along;

jl 7/10/98; 5/23/02