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The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
Letter from Kenneth A. Bisset to Joshua Lederberg pdf (236,333 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Kenneth A. Bisset to Joshua Lederberg
Description:
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
4 (236,333 Bytes)
Date:
1948-10-21 (October 21, 1948)
Creator:
Bisset, Kenneth A.
University of Birmingham (England)
Recipient:
Lederberg, Joshua
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of the University of Birmingham (England).
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: Correspondence B
Box Number: 6
Folder Number: 131
Unique Identifier:
BBACLE
Accession Number:
5
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1935-2002
SubSeries: 1947-1953
Folder: Bisset, Kenneth A.
Transcript:
21/10/48
Dear Dr. Lederberg,
Thank you for your letter, and the reprints which I shall be very pleased to have.
I, of course, concur with most of your criticisms. I have attempted to explain the observed phenomena but I wouldn't go bail on any of my suggestions.
I think that the "chromosomes" are more correctly chromosome complexes. Bacteria do have resting nuclei, of a
[END PAGE ONE]
[BEGIN PAGE TWO]
number of types, some of which I am now trying to describe, but they seem to remain in the mitotic condition for an extended period during the logarithmic phase of active cell division. This is unusual, I will admit, but surely not inconceivable.
As regards the "trinucleate" condition. This is based upon actually counting the little beggars. This is difficult in the original, goddam difficult in a photograph, and impossible in a photograve reproduction.
I have enclosed a few original prints for you to compare with my tracings.
May I also add--what is, perhaps, another glimpse of the obvious--that I am not a geneticist.
When I have completed my present work upon the resting nucleus, and the
[END PAGE TWO]
[BEGIN PAGE THREE]
sexual process (if such they are) connected with it, I will send you a note of my results, and subsequently some reprints, if anybody can be found rash enough to print it.
I sincerely wish that I could manage to get upon collaborating terms with a geneticist who might be prepared to tackle these problems.
That sexuality does exist in bacteria, I am convinced. I think that it takes a very varied form in different
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[BEGIN PAGE FOUR]
groups, and may be repressed at times.
After all, the fungi have a sufficient diversity of modes of sexuality, within their group.
In conclusion, may I ask if you have read my paper. J. Gen. Microbiol. 2. 83. of which I have, unfortunately, no reprints left. This goes into the question of "chromosome" doubling, but antedates my belief that they are always paired; so for "single chromatinic body", read:--"one pair of ?x?x?"
Not to be confused with the Old English "pair of unmentionables" (Anglice trousers, Amer. pants.) Pray forgive my, unpremeditated flippancy,
Yours sincerely,
K.A. Bisset
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2006-04-25
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