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The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
Breeding Analysis of Natural Units in Behavior Genetics Annotation pdf (820,674 Bytes) ocr (26,415 Bytes)
Breeding Analysis of Natural Units in Behavior Genetics
Number of Image Pages:
7 (820,674 Bytes)
Date:
1964
Creator:
Hirsch, Jerry
Source:
Periodical: Hirsch, Jerry. "Breeding Analysis of Natural Units in Behavior Genetics." American Zoologist 4, (1964): 139-145. Article. 7 Images.
Publisher:
Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of American Zoologist.
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: Correspondence D
Metadata Record Letter from Jerry Hirsch to Joshua Lederberg (January 4, 1965) pdf (44,164 Bytes) ocr (537 Bytes)
/ps/access/BBAJEM.pdf
Box Number: 19
Folder Number: 144
Unique Identifier:
BBAJEN
Accession Number:
13
Document Type:
Articles
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1935-2002
SubSeries: 1961-1978
Folder: Hirsch, Jerry
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2005-10-13
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples

Annotation by Joshua Lederberg:
KW: Hirsch, Jerry , article, American Zoologist 4:139-145  1964
Cites JL query "how define behavior"; CASBS;

BREEDING ANALYSIS OF NATURAL UNITS IN BEHAVIOR GENETICS
JERRY HIRSCH
Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana

On receiving my assignment for this refresher course, my
self-appointed task became an examination of the term behavior,
and consideration of the kind of knowledge genetic analysis has to
contribute to the understanding of behavior and behavior analysis
has to contribute to understanding in biology.

At a reception following a conference two summers ago, Joshua
Lederberg asked me "How d o you define behavior?" It' s a
disconcerting experience at any time to be caught off guard
harboring an unanalyzed premise. It's doubly so when it happens
on one's first encounter with a Nobel laureate. A survey of
textbook and dictionary definitions proves very unsatisfactory and
suggests a possible reason for his question.  In one form or
another, most definitions hinge upon response to stimulation. As
Skinner (1938) has so appropriately pointed out, while response to
stimulation certainly does occur, so does behavior occur in the
absence of antecedent events that bear an easily demonstrable
stimulating relation to a given behavior.


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