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The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
[Lederberg's notes for a letter to "Science" on Aldous Huxley (not sent)] Annotation pdf (52,235 Bytes) transcript of pdf
[Lederberg's notes for a letter to "Science" on Aldous Huxley (not sent)]
Description:
Lederberg's notes for a letter to "Science" (not sent)
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
1 (52,235 Bytes)
Date:
1964-01 (January 1964)
Creator:
Lederberg, Joshua
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: Correspondence D
Box Number: 19
Folder Number: 201
Unique Identifier:
BBAJGV
Accession Number:
13
Document Type:
Notes
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1935-2002
SubSeries: 1961-1978
Folder: Huxley, Aldous
Transcript:
1/64
Science
The eulogy of Aldous Huxley in Science (by John Walsh, the 13 December issue) might have reassured him that scientists were not so obliviously irresponsible despite their aspiration to the "higher life."
At least in a personal conversation he was equally critical of the scientific ignorance and no-nothing attitude that permeates contemporary literature. If Huxley's criticism was so focused [sic] on scientists, this was the compliment of some hope of their understanding. Among our great writers he stood nearly alone in his apprehension of the modern world and the technical forces that impel its uncertain gyrations.
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2011-08-15
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Annotation by Joshua Lederberg:
KW: handwritten note, draft not sent to Science.;
re: Huxley, Aldous. Science 12/13/63 eulogy by John Walsh;

draft for -->Science                       1/64
     The eulogy of Aldous Huxley in
Science (by John Walsh, the 13
December issue) might have reassured
him that scientists were not so
obliviously irresponsible despite their
aspiration to the "higher life".
     At least in a personal
conversation he was equally
critical of the scientific
ignorance and [know]-nothing attitude
that permeates contemporary
literature.  If Huxley's criticism was
so focussed on scientists, this was the
compliment of some hope of their
understanding.  Among our great writers
he stood nearly alone in his
apprehension of the modern world and
the technical forces that impel its
uncertain gyrations.  [Not sent]


jl 8/19/02