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The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
Letter from Michael G. P. Stoker, Royal Society of London to Joshua Lederberg Annotation pdf (81,596 Bytes) ocr (2,230 Bytes)
Letter from Michael G. P. Stoker, Royal Society of London to Joshua Lederberg
Number of Image Pages:
1 (81,596 Bytes)
Date:
1979-04-26 (April 26, 1979)
Creator:
Stoker, Michael G. P.
Royal Society of London
Recipient:
Lederberg, Joshua
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of Michael G. P. Stoker.
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: Correspondence E
Box Number: 36
Folder Number: 177
Unique Identifier:
BBARJP
Accession Number:
81
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1935-2002
SubSeries: 1978-1984
Folder: Royal Society of London
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2007-03-06
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples

Annotation by Joshua Lederberg:
KW: my election as Foreign Member, Royal Society;
It was some years before I signed the book (June 1996);
[N.B. R2 .tl +++ April 29, 1994
To:  Robert K. Merton
Re:  Obliteration (crepuscular)

  I had occasion last week to peruse the Book of members at
the Royal Society, London.  There pointed out to me (of course)
was I. Newton's signature -- and just below it one nearly
obliterated (do you recall who that is?), the result of innumerable
prior dactylic pointings before they inserted a plastic cover
sheet.  Have I correctly classified the phenomenon?
  You and others have, I am sure, commented on differential wear
as a bibliometric index, but I had not noted the secondary
obliteration.  For some reason Mencken's name comes to my mind.
;

jl 2/21/00


jl 2/21/00