Skip to main contentU.S. National Library of MedicineU.S. National Library of Medicine


Profiles in Science
   
Pinterest badge Follow Profiles in Science on Pinterest!

The Joshua Lederberg Papers

Title:
Letter from Joshua Lederberg to M. F. Brink, National Dairy Council Annotation pdf (87,152 Bytes) ocr (2,356 Bytes)
Letter from Joshua Lederberg to M. F. Brink, National Dairy Council
Number of Image Pages:
1 (87,152 Bytes)
Date:
1969-02-14 (February 14, 1969)
Creator:
Lederberg, Joshua
Recipient:
Brink, M. F.
National Dairy Council
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Relation:
Lederberg Grouping: SAM Science and Man Series
Box Number: 105
Folder Number: 19
Unique Identifier:
BBGDME
Accession Number:
92
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Writings
SubSeries: Science and Man
Folder: S18: "A Hereditary Tummy-Ache?" (20 November 1966)
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2006-05-04
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples

Annotation by Joshua Lederberg:
KW: alactasia, lactose-intolerance; [what is current understanding
of genetic basis?; why didn't I suggest techno-fix, add
lactase?] -- current vindication:
  Racial bias in federal nutrition policy, part I: The public health implications of
                   variations in lactase persistence
                   Bertron P, Barnard ND, Mills M
        JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 
                  91: (3) 151-157 MAR 1999                   
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans form the basis For all federal nutrition programs
and incorporate the Food Guide Pyramid, a tool to educate consumers on putting the
Guidelines into practice. The Pyramid recommends two to three daily servings of dairy
products. However, research has shown that lactase nonpersistence, the loss of enzymes
that digest the milk sugar lactose, occurs in a majority of African-, Asian-, Hispanic-,
and Native-American individuals. Whites are less likely to develop lactase
nonpersistence and less likely to have symptoms when it does occur. Calcium is available
in other foods that do not contain lactose. Osteoporosis is less common among African
Americans and Mexican Americans than among whites, and there is little evidence that
dairy products have an effect on osteoporosis among racial minorities. Evidence suggests
that a modification of federal nutrition policies, making dairy-product use optional in
light of other calcium sources, may be a helpful public health measure;

7/1/00