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The Charles R. Drew Papers

Title:
Letter from Charles R. Drew to Lenore (Robbins) Drew pdf (1,568,207 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Charles R. Drew to Lenore (Robbins) Drew
Description:
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
5 (1,568,207 Bytes)
Date:
1949-07-03 (July 3, 1949)
Creator:
[Drew, Charles R.]
Recipient:
[Drew, Lenore (Robbins)]
Source:
Original Repository: Howard University. Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. Charles R. Drew Papers
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.
Exhibit Category:
"My Chief Interest Was and Is Surgery"--Howard University, 1941-1950
Relation:
Metadata Record Sun Rise Over Old Bridge and Castle [1900s] jpg (39,668 Bytes)
/ps/access/BGBBDP_.jpg
Unique Identifier:
BGBBDN
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Transcript:
Sunday, July 3, 1949
Stuttgart, Germany
Dear Lenore,
This is a bright beautiful afternoon. We arrived here by train about an hour ago from Heidelberg and now await further orders. The most striking thing in Heidelberg, the old 13th Century University town which by common agreement was spared by the war, was the beauty of its two mountains, Konigstuhl on the north side of the Neckar River and Heiligenberg on the South with its ancient looking, sturdy red stone houses climbing each slope upwards from the banks of the river. There is
[END PAGE ONE]
[BEGIN PAGE TWO]
quaintness and disrepair in the University buildings. Nothing matches the modern splendor of our schools. The clinic buildings are shabby.
We have very little direct contact with the Germans. Americans have taken over the best hotels, the best hospitals, the best homes for their officers. We are a part of an invading army. They accept it rather stoically, we feel it.
We use American script for money and have not yet been able to get German marks. We eat in proscribed areas, live with the army and travel in American cars and German trains. I should like to return to Heidelberg some day when
[END PAGE TWO]
[BEGIN PAGE THREE]
the tension of war is gone. On the roads outside of town and the small villages one sees the women with their hoes working the fields as they did a hundred years ago. The villages have narrow streets, the peasants look as though they came out of story books -- plodding, hard-working, unemotional -- only the kids are happy. There seem to be thousands of kids, hundreds of bicycles on every road and lane. Automobiles are seldom seen out of town. The farms are beautiful. Every inch of ground is used. The chief crops seem to be wheat, barley, potatoes, clover for fodder, poppies
[END PAGE THREE]
[BEGIN PAGE FOUR]
for poppy seed, oats, some mustard and/or a few beans. Have seen very few tractors. On these farms the world has not changed very fast.
In the other towns I have seen so far the one overwhelming impression is that of staggering destruction. Mannheim, once a proud industrial center has been leveled to the ground, Heilbronn, which resisted the 7th Armies' advance is not much more than a shell. Even now four years later, very little rebuilding has taken place. The once great station here at Stuttgart still has no roof and there are
[END PAGE FOUR]
[BEGIN PAGE FIVE]
scars on every hand. The Germans were not hurt like this during the first war. They have been whipped 'til it hurts this time. They don't like it but still are not too anxious to have all of the Americans go because there is real fear that the Russians will walk in -- War is even in its aftermath an almost totally unhappy thing.
The Col. has arrived. Off we go.
Love and kisses for you and all the kids.
Charlie
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2010-12-08
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