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The Clarence Dennis Papers

Title:
Testimony Given Before the Hearing of the House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Concerning Bill H.R. 12488 (Poage) and Bill H.R. 9743 (Resnick) pdf (161,545 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Testimony Given Before the Hearing of the House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Concerning Bill H.R. 12488 (Poage) and Bill H.R. 9743 (Resnick)
Description:
Brooklyn, New York 11203
Item is a photocopy.
Number of Image Pages:
2 (161,545 Bytes)
Date:
1966-03-08 (March 8, 1966)
Creator:
Dennis, Clarence
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Animal Experimentation
Legislation as Topic
Exhibit Category:
Building a Department of Surgery at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 1951-1972
Relation:
Metadata Record Letter from Maurice B. Visscher to Clarence Dennis [20 January, 7 February 1966] pdf (138,274 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLB.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. [Walter] Riker (March 3, 1966) pdf (143,889 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLC.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice B. Visscher (March 3, 1966) pdf (93,806 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLD.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (March 17, 1966) pdf (209,992 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLG.pdf
Metadata Record Phone Conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (March 21, 1966) pdf (79,709 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLH.pdf
Metadata Record Phone Conversation with Dr. Lowell Greenbaum (March 31, 1966) pdf (593,203 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLJ.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (April 18, 1966) pdf (297,537 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLK.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. M. Visscher (May 18, 1966) pdf (314,340 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLM.pdf
Metadata Record Re: Telephone conversation with Dr. Robert H. Williams (May 26, 1966) pdf (351,812 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLN.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone Conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (May 26, 1966) pdf (448,431 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLP.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Lowell Greenbaum (June 6, 1966) pdf (181,513 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLQ.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone Conversation - June 9, 1966 Lowell Greenbaum (June 9, 1966) pdf (441,911 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLR.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (June 10, 1966) pdf (364,082 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLS.pdf
Metadata Record A Suggested Program for the National Society for Medical Research for 1966-7 [ca. 1966] pdf (499,699 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLT.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher - 6/16/66 - Wash. DC (June 16, 1966) pdf (165,527 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLV.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone Conversation - 6/20/66 (June 20, 1966) pdf (301,825 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLW.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Mr. Holt,/Washington, DC (June 22, 1966) pdf (286,622 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLX.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Mrs. Rosalie Earle, Executive Secretary of the New York State Society for Medical Research (July 21, 1966) pdf (182,359 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBLZ.pdf
Metadata Record Phone talk with Visscher July 21, 1966 (July 21, 1966) pdf (227,664 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBMB.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Maurice Visscher (July 22, 1966) pdf (349,539 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBMC.pdf
Metadata Record Telephone conversation with Dr. Visscher and Dr. Dennis (August 5, 1966) pdf (226,809 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/BXBBMF.pdf
Box Number: 20
Folder Number: 5
Unique Identifier:
BXBBLF
Document Type:
Testimonies
Legislative records
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Professional Activities, 1931-2003
SubSeries: National Society for Medical Research, 1962-1987
SubSubSeries: Animal Legislation, 1964-1984
Folder: Correspondence and Talk with Visscher and Others on Legislation, 1966-1968
Transcript:
Testimony Given Before The Hearing Of The House Of Representatives Committee On Agriculture, Washington, D. C., Concerning Bill H.R. 12488 (Poage) and Bill H.R. 9743 (Resnick) - March 8, 1966.
I am Dr. Clarence Dennis, Chairman of the Department of Surgery at The State University of New York Downstate Medical School and President of The Society for Vascular Surgery, and also represent The International Cardiovascular Society. My primary responsibility as a professor of surgery is education, firstly of students in medical school, and secondly of medical graduates who seek to become well-trained surgeons.
I shall clarify to you that the proposed bills as written, aside from being unnecessary in the light of existing laws, are a serious threat to the health of all of us.
During the past thirty years, there has been an explosion of scientific progress with no previous counterpart in the history of mankind. The advances have been too rapid to be grasped in full by even the most brilliant mind, and the scientific panorama about us is changing with breathtaking rapidity. Twenty years ago poliomyelitis was rampant; today research has made it rare. Twenty years ago congenital defects within the heart could not be surgically corrected; today open-heart operations are brilliantly effective, developed through work with dogs. Twenty years ago damage to the arteries and great vessels, whether from injury or from the changes associated with age, could not be consistently repaired, and patients with gangrene of the feet, either with or without diabetes, nearly always lost either their legs or their lives; today successful repair or replacement has become commonplace, again as a result of work on dogs. These are but a few examples.
A corollary of this rapid expansion of scientific activity has been an immense increase in the volume of the scientific literature. It is that scholar with an intellect critically trained and cultured in the processes of sound scientific investigation who can best sift in the literature the real from the unreal, the true from the untrue, the promising from the unpromising, the safe from the unsafe. The life of any one of us may depend today or tomorrow upon the exercise of such critical judgment.
The basic introduction to the methods of research and to the patterns of thought in research enables the student to gain the same critical analytical approach to everything he may seek to learn in the medical world. To an alert doctor, every patient represents an individual research problem. The student is therefore taught the methods of research analysis and approach, in order that he may use them in that fashion most favorable to the patient.
While my presentation of the importance of basic research experience in the education of a good doctor or investigator may not have been appreciated by some who listen, the paramount importance of basic animal experimentation to progress in the provision of health measures to mankind is obvious to all who care to understand and think.
Within the past few months, noisy publicity upon some instances of dishonest and evil methods in providing animals for sale to reputable and indeed highly esteemed educational institutions has led to a change in the laws of Pennsylvania aimed particularly at dogs to be utilized for experimental purposes. A result has been strangulation of our flow of appropriate animals.
The result of this in turn has been a serious compromise of our medical educational processes and research endeavors in Brooklyn. Teaching programs have had to be curtailed at the expense of the education provided. Research programs have been curtailed at increased cost to us all as taxpayers, and our effectiveness in helping you has been hampered.
It may seem that I have concentrated upon the need for proper utilization of certain experimental animals in our activities toward the betterment of mankind, rather than upon the problems relating to animal dealers with which the bills under consideration are concerned. The bills in question, I call upon you to note, will be crippling to the training of the quality of doctors which the nation deserves as well as to the improvement of our knowledge on how to deal with disease unless changed as has been suggested in earlier testimony. They therefore constitute a threat to the health of all of us as they stand.
Clarence Dennis, M. D.
Professor and Chairman
Department of Surgery
State University of New York
Downstate Medical Center
450 Clarkson Avenue
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2011-05-27
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