Skip to main contentU.S. National Library of MedicineU.S. National Library of Medicine


Profiles in Science
   
Pinterest badge Follow Profiles in Science on Pinterest!

The Oswald T. Avery Collection

Title:
Chemical Nature and Biological Specificity of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types: Abstract pdf (92,913 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Chemical Nature and Biological Specificity of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types: Abstract
Description:
Abstract of a speech read at the Annual Meeting of the American Chemical Society Symposium on Biochemical and Biophysical Studies on Viruses, Atlantic City, NJ.
Item is a photocopy.
Number of Image Pages:
2 (92,913 Bytes)
Date:
1946-04 (April 1946)
Creator:
McCarty, Maclyn
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of Maclyn McCarty.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Transformation, Genetic
DNA
Exhibit Category:
After the Discovery: The Transforming Principle's Reception by the Scientific Community
Relation:
Metadata Record Letter from Oswald T. Avery to Wendell M. Stanley (January 5, 1946) pdf (51,267 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAACK.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Wendell M. Stanley to Oswald T. Avery (January 9, 1946) pdf (40,975 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAACL.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from James T. Grady to Maclyn McCarty (February 28, 1946) pdf (46,889 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAACO.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Thomas M. Rivers to the New York District Medical Office (April 10, 1946) pdf (38,740 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAACQ.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Wendell M. Stanley to Maclyn McCarty (April 16, 1946) pdf (36,288 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAACR.pdf
Metadata Record Chemical Nature and Biological Specificity of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types (April 12, 1946) pdf (787,035 Bytes) ocr (16,990 Bytes)
/ps/access/CCAACV.pdf
Box Number: 4
Folder Number: 1
Unique Identifier:
CCAACS
Document Type:
Abstracts (summaries)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Research and Discovery of the Transforming Principle, 1912-1999
SubSeries: Succeeding Research
Folder: 1943-1944, 1979
Transcript:
The specific substance responsible for the induction of transformation of pneumococcal types has been isolated from three separate types of Pneumococcus in the form of desoxyribonucleic acid fractions. Chemical, physico-chemical and serological analysis of the purified material support the view that biological activity is a property of the desoxyribonucleic acid. Further evidence on this point has been obtained by the application of enzymatic techniques. The enzyme desoxyribonuclease has been isolated in purified form from beef pancreas and has been shown to be highly active in attacking polymerized desoxyribonucleic acid from animal sources. In concentrations of less than 0.01 ug. per cc. desoxyribonuclease causes complete and irreversible lose of biological activity of the transforming substance. The enzymatic evidence is thus confirmatory of the desoxyribonucleic acid nature of the active substance.
While the results obtained with the transforming substance indicate that desoxyribonucleic acids possess biological specificity, the chemical basis of this specificity is not known. The implications of the present studies with respect to the problem of specificity of the nucleic acids are discussed.
The biological properties of the transforming substance present analogies to those of viruses. However, in the case of the pneumococcal agent, the apparent absence of protein and the marked susceptibility to enzymatic destruction provide significant points of difference.
From the United States Navy Research Unit at the Hospital of The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research
The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery of the U.S. Navy does not necessarily undertake to endorse the views or opinions which are expressed in this paper.
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2008-08-28
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples