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The Oswald T. Avery Collection

Title:
Letter from Jack S. Cohen to Alfred E. Mirsky pdf (112,582 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Jack S. Cohen to Alfred E. Mirsky
Description:
One in a series of letters between Cohen and Mirsky regarding the chemical nature of DNA. In 1974, Cohen produced an article with Franklin Portugal on the subject that appeared in "Connecticut Medicine."
Item is a photocopy.
Number of Image Pages:
2 (112,582 Bytes)
Date:
1974-02-22 (February 22, 1974)
Creator:
Cohen, Jack S.
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Recipient:
Mirsky, Alfred E.
Source:
Original Repository: Rockefeller Archive Center. Alfred E. Mirsky Papers
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
History of Medicine
Relation:
Metadata Record Letter from Alfred E. Mirsky to Jack S. Cohen (June 29, 1973) pdf (387,776 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAAHR.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Jack S. Cohen to Alfred E. Mirsky (July 25, 1973) pdf (85,032 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAAHS.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Jack S. Cohen to Alfred E. Mirsky (January 25, 1974) pdf (350,245 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAAHT.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Alfred E. Mirsky to Jack S. Cohen (January 29, 1974) pdf (73,223 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CCAAHU.pdf
Metadata Record The Search for the Chemical Structure of DNA (October 1974) pdf (907,646 Bytes) ocr (27,519 Bytes)
/ps/access/CCAAHW.pdf
Box Number: 4
Folder Number: 7
Unique Identifier:
CCAAHV
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Commentary on Avery and His Work, 1944-2005
SubSeries: Chronological
Folder: 1969-1974
Transcript:
February 22, 1974
Dear Dr. Mirsky:
Upon consideration of the points made in your letter of January 29 I have decided to delete the offending reference. I am glad you are writing an account of your own involvement in this important area, and I hope you will eventually send me a copy.
Yours sincerely,
Jack S. Cohen
Reproduction Research Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Revised footnote 143.
Alfred Mirsky, also working at the Rockefeller Institute, has been mentioned as one of the chief questioners of DNA as the transforming substance by Chargaff (ref. 75), Hotchkiss (ref. 144b) and Stent (Molecular Genetics, Freeman, San Francisco, 1971, p. 180).
Mirsky's views at the time are most clearly expressed as; Avery and his colleagues have shown decisively by inactivation experiments that desoxyribose nucleic acid is an essential part of the transforming agent, and if there actually is no protein in their preparation, it would be obvious that the agent consists of nothing but nucleic acid. This is a conclusion of the greatest interest in the study of the chemical basis of biological specificity, and it should therefore be scrutinized carefully. There can be little doubt in the mind of anyone who has prepared nucleic acid that traces of protein probably remain in even the best preparations. With the tests now available for detecting how much protein is present in a nucleic acid preparation, it is probable that as much as 1 or 2 per cent of protein could be present in a preparation of "pure, protein-free" nucleic acid. One of the most sensitive direct tests for protein is the Millon reaction,
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2008-09-24
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