Skip to main contentU.S. National Library of MedicineU.S. National Library of Medicine


Profiles in Science
   
Pinterest badge Follow Profiles in Science on Pinterest!

The Oswald T. Avery Collection

Title:
Letter from David Perkins to Joshua Lederberg pdf (60,062 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from David Perkins to Joshua Lederberg
Description:
In the early 1970s, Lederberg worked diligently to dispel what he believed was the "myth" that Avery's work on the "transforming principle" was not widely appreciated by scientists when it first appeared in the mid-1940s. This letter from Perkins to Lederberg was written on the same sheet as a letter from Lederberg to Perkins dated 14 September 1972.
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
1 (60,062 Bytes)
Date:
1972-09-15 (September 15, 1972)
Creator:
Perkins, David
Recipient:
Lederberg, Joshua
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of David Perkins.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Transformation, Genetic
History of Medicine
Exhibit Category:
After the Discovery: The Transforming Principle's Reception by the Scientific Community
Box Number: 5
Folder Number: 2
Unique Identifier:
CCAAJL
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Commentary on Avery and His Work, 1944-2005
SubSeries: Inquiries on Avery
Folder: Lederberg Inquiries, 1962, 1972-1978
Transcript:
[stamped, SEP 14 1972]
Perkins
Dear Dave --
Can you recall anything of how "Avery" was communicated to the Zoology Dept. in 1943-45?
Josh.
15 Sept
Dear Josh:
Harriett Taylor was the key, I suspect. I heard her give a review of Avery's work in a seminar run by L.C. Dunn in 1942, before I left for the army. Some time after that, she arranged to go to Rockefeller to work in Avery's lab. I know she felt the transformation work to be crucial.
Salome Waelsch was an intimate of Harriett's at the time, and would know the details of her decision and her role in bringing Avery's work to the attention of the people in Schermerhorn, where she worked on the 10th floor but was in close touch with people on the 8th. Rollin Hotchkiss would, of course, know the Rockefeller end of things. (He and Harriett were the only ones in Avery's lab during his last two years at Rockefeller, according to Rollin's biographical article in Genetics 51 (1965).)
Regards,
David
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2013-04-26
Linked Data:
RDF/XML     JSON     JSON-LD     N3/Turtle     N-Triples