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The Virginia Apgar Papers

Title:
Letter from Karl A. Connell to Virginia Apgar pdf (52,123 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Karl A. Connell to Virginia Apgar
Description:
Responding to Apgar's letter of March 21, 1939, Connell provided more information on "intercoupling" patient, anesthetist, and gas machine with special static-reducing tape to prevent the generation of static sparks that could ignite anesthesia gases and cause an explosion.
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
1 (52,123 Bytes)
Date Supplied:
ca. 9 April 1939
Creator:
Connell, Karl A.
[Connell Apparatus]
Recipient:
Apgar, Virginia
Source:
Original Repository: Mount Holyoke College. Archives and Special Collections. Virginia Apgar Papers [MS 0504]
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of Karl Connell.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Anesthesiology
Exhibit Category:
Establishing a New Specialty, 1938-1949
Relation:
Metadata Record Letter from Karl A. Connell to Virginia Apgar (March 9, 1939) pdf (1,727,659 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CPBBFD.pdf
Metadata Record Letter from Virginia Apgar to Karl A. Connell (March 21, 1939) pdf (55,211 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/CPBBFF.pdf
Box Number: 5
Folder Number: 4
Unique Identifier:
CPBBFH
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence 1925-1974
Folder: 1939-1940
Transcript:
[written in top right corner in different handwriting, Received Apr 10 1939]
Dear Dr Apgar:
Dr. Williams will check and deliver to you the real thing, collodial [sic] graphite electroresistor tape. One end around the patients arm and tucked under the mattress, the continuity say 4 feet to the apparatus [?] the further continuity to a cool [?] which the anesthetist wears continually on the wrist when near the patient.
This intercoupling mandatory on all anesthesia and whatever instrument.
The only residual danger then is rubber static (and sodalime as catalyst???) Rubber is killed as a generator and holder of static by rinsing in 4 percent [ . . . ]/2 and letting this dry on the rubber. Dr Williams has long preached this. The Roosevelt explosion brings it acutely to the fore, for that explosion began in the sodalime, bag side of the flutter valves.
I will show the Bac 1/2 effect on rubber on Friday meeting.
My best
Sincerely
Karl Connell
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2006-08-21
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