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The Michael E. DeBakey Papers

Letter from Michael E. DeBakey to Lieutenant Colonel I. M. Gage pdf (151,468 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Michael E. DeBakey to Lieutenant Colonel I. M. Gage
Number of Image Pages:
2 (151,468 Bytes)
1942-12-07 (December 7, 1942)
DeBakey, Michael E.
Gage, I. M.
Reproduced with permission of Katrin DeBakey.
Exhibit Category:
From Tulane School of Medicine to the U.S. Army, 1928-1946
Box Number:
Unique Identifier:
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Physical Condition:
Series: Correspondence, 1921-2007
SubSeries: A-Z [photographs], 1930-2007
Folder: G-H, 1935-2006
December 7, 1942
Dear Colonel Gage,
I certainly enjoyed the receipt of your recent letter and learning that all does well with the Tulane Unit. I, too, have missed you and have frequently longed to express to you certain tribulations and to hear you express in your inimitable fashion the best means of disposing them.
Since arriving here I have had a number of interesting experiences and learned many broadening facts. I have been ordered to Washington, Atlanta, and several other places, have been invited to give some talks at several station hospitals, and on one occasion invited to Camp Shelby to operate on an arterio-venous aneurysm. By the way, you would have venous aneurysm of the brachial artery and vein, one of which was between the artery and the superficial (median basilio) vein. It was an easy dissection and for once everything went off beautifully as a demonstration and Colonel Reed (Chief of the Surgical Service there) has since told me he has completely recovered.
I certainly regretted not seeing you in Atlanta recently. Turner was there and we had a pleasant visit. He told me how well everyone was doing. I flew up to the meeting in an AT6C at night and there was a full moon -- it was a beautiful sight. I am sorry that you did not get to the meeting for several reasons, for in addition to the fact that I missed seeing you, there were several surgical papers presented that would have interested you. Some of these were on the wonderful results on the "new" excision and primary closure method of treating pilonidal sinus. I was so mad that in the discussion I told them that this was all well and good and that I thoroughly agreed with the speakers, but there was really nothing new about the method and that under your direction, and as a result of your studies, we had been doing this for the last seven years.
Our hospital here is a typical army type of approximately 900 beds, however, we have not received all our supplies and therefore are not in operation but expect to soon. In fact, we had hoped to be operating by this time but I have now learned that in the army you develop patience and waiting becomes part of the program. We have a fairly good surgical service organized with Harry Morris in charge of orthopedics. Jerry Schroeder in charge of general surgery, Roy Kleinsasser, in charge of septic surgery, a former Tulanian, in charge of G.U., and a boy by the name of Wilson (excellent training) in charge of E.M.T. You can see that Tulane is well represented and that we have a nice group of fellows.
We have been very fortunate as far as our living accommodations are concerned. We have a nice cottage right on the beach with a big yard for Mickey to play in. The house is relatively new with good appointments and hot air heating. We are really more comfortable here than in New Orleans. Diana has gained a little, developed better color, and feels so much better. I certainly wish you and Jane could visit us.
I'm going to mess now. Remember me to all the fellows and my best to you.
Michael DeBakey
Capt., M.C.,
Chief of Surgical Service
P.S. You will be interested to know that Ernest is at the School of Aviation Medicine learning to be a Flight Surgeon.
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