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The Michael E. DeBakey Papers

Title:
[Minutes of the second meeting of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (including attachments)] pdf (595,774 Bytes) transcript of pdf
[Minutes of the second meeting of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (including attachments)]
Description:
Held at the Army Medical Museum in Washington, DC, the agenda included a bus tour of possible sites for the new National Library of Medicine building and subsequent considerations.
Item is a photocopy.
Number of Image Pages:
13 (595,774 Bytes)
Date:
1957-04-29 (April 29, 1957)
Creator:
Rogers, Frank B.
National Library of Medicine. Board of Regents
Source:
Original Repository: National Library of Medicine. Records of the National Library of Medicine. Board of Regent's Minutes, 1957-1993
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Exhibit Category:
Supporting the Medical Enterprise: DeBakey and National Library of Medicine
Relation:
Metadata Record [Frank B. Rogers and the NLM Board of Regents] [20 March 1957] jpg (238,863 Bytes)
/ps/access/FJBBDP_.jpg
Metadata Record [Agenda and minutes of the first meeting of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine (including "Consideration of site for new building")] (March 20, 1957) pdf (603,505 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/FJBBRN.pdf
Unique Identifier:
FJBBRP
Document Type:
Minutes (administrative records)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Transcript:
Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine
Minutes of the second meeting, FY 1957
Washington, April 29, 1957
Member absent: Wilson. In the absence of Dr. Burney, Dr. W. Palmer Dearing, Deputy Surgeon General, Public Health Service, attended.
Morning session: During the morning the Board proceeded by chartered bus to the area on Capitol Hill east of the Folger Library; thence to the southern portion of the Soldiers' Home tract; thence to the Naval Medical Center grounds at Bethesda; thence to the campus of the National Institutes of Health, returning to the Library at noon. Following lunch, the afternoon session was called to order at 12:30 p.m.
Minutes of the last meeting: Approved as circulated.
Communications received: The Chairman read communications received from the Association of American Medical Colleges from the American Association of Dental Schools, endorsing the Washington area is the site for the new library building. Copies of these letters are attached as part of Tab E.
Discussion of Chicago Offer
Letter from Dr. Theobald: The Chairman reviewed briefly the letters received by members of the Board from Dr. Walter J. Theobald, Chairman of the Chicago Medical Center Commission. A copy of the letter received by the Chairman is attached as Tab A.
Letter from Mayor Richard J. Daley: The Chairman read a letter received from the Hon. Richard J. Daley, Mayor of Chicago (copy attached as Tab B). In replying to Mayor Daley, the chairman appointed Dr. Volwiler to inspect the proffered site reported to the Board. (See Tab C.)
Report on Chicago site: Dr. Volwiler reported that on Saturday afternoon, April 27, in company with Mr. McLester and Mr. Drowns, members of the Medical Center Commission, he had visited the Chicago Medical Center District. This is an area encompassing about 305 acres, located about two miles west of the Loop, set aside by act of the Illinois legislature for use as a medical center. The University of Illinois Medical School, the Cook County Hospital, and several other large medical institutions are located there.
Dr. Volwiler produced a map of the area, oriented the members of the Board as to major highways and access roads, and pointed out the triangular area offered as a site for the National Library of Medicine. He reported on a conversation by phone with Dr. Theobald on the afternoon of Sunday, April 28. He summarized his impressions by saying that he believed this was a very good site, in a major medical center, and easily accessible.
General Ogle asked if there had been any mention of housing for personnel. Dr. Volwiler said that this had been discussed, and that housing was adequate.
The chairman extended his thanks to Dr. Volwiler.
Motion: Dr. Ravdin moved the National Library of Medicine be located in Washington, D. C., Or its environs. Dr. DeBakey seconded the motion. The action was put to a vote and carried unanimously.
Location in Washington Area
Discussion: The Chairman reviewed the areas seen on the morning trip. General Ogle mentioned the possibility of a Foggy Bottom site. At the invitation of the Chairman, Admiral Hogan spoke in favor of the Bethesda area, and again offered the site on the Naval Medical Center grounds. General Hayes established that adequate parking areas would be available on either of the Bethesda sites. The Chairman reported on what was known of sub-soil conditions at Soldiers' Home, Naval Medical Center, and National Institutes of Health (see Tab D). In response to question from Dr. Volwiler, Colonel Rogers review the three sites, with special attention to accessibility. Dr. Lyons remarked that he believes that existing plans for building on the Naval Medical Center site were not precisely detailed plans, and that they would require very extensive modification. I'm questions from Dr. Volwiler and Dr. Ravdin, Admiral Hogan mentioned supporting services that would be available from the Naval Medical Center. On a question from Dr. Curran, Dr. Dearing discussed supporting services in connection with the National Institutes of Health site. Dr. Francis and General Ogle questioned Colonel Rogers in relation to availability of downtown sites on Constitution Avenue, the Mall, and Capitol Hill. Dr. Spector, Dr. Dearing, Dr. Mumford, Dr. Middleton and the Chairman discussed problems of transportation to the best area.
Motion: Dr. Ravdin moved the site located in the southeast sector of the grounds of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, and offered by the Public Health Service, be approved as the site for the new building of the National Library of Medicine. Dr. DeBakey seconded the motion.
There was considerable discussion from all sides on two main points: 1) the amount of ground over which the Library would have jurisdiction, and 2) possible limitations on style of architecture allowable. General Hayes felt that a resolution on style of architecture might serve only to hamstring the project.
Dr. Lyons moved to amend Dr. Ravdin's motion to add the proviso that at least 10 acres of land should be available for the Library's use. Dr. Volwiler seconded. Admiral Hogan expressed concern over possible increased construction costs on the NIH site over the Naval Medical Center site, due to less favorable terrain configuration.
The Chairman called for a vote on the amendment offered by Dr. Lyons. It was passed without dissent. He then called for a vote on Dr. Ravdin's motion; it was unanimously carried.
The Chairman distributed copies of the draft of a letter to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service stating the position of the Board. There was a lengthy discussion, with many changes of language proposed and accepted. Dr. Lyons moved, and Dr. DeBakey seconded, that at the conclusion of the letter the Board should recommend that the highest priority should be given to the obtaining of funds for construction of the new National Library of Medicine; this resolution was carried unanimously. A copy of the final version of the letter as transmitted to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service is attached as Tab E.
Changing NLM Loan Policy
Orientation: Board members had previously received a discussion outline entitled "Considerations for Formulation of Loan Policy." Colonel Rogers briefly reviewed this paper.
Discussion: Dr. Mumford raised the question of copyright restrictions. It was stated that while the recommended new policy would not obviate the copyright problem, it would not raise more, and probably raise fewer difficulties in this area then does the current policy.
Miss Marshall was strongly in favor of the new policy, and reviewed experiences at her own medical library, indicating the favorable effects of the new program.
Several members, and most particularly the Chairman, expressed some concern about the public-relations problem which the new policy would entail. It was indicated that if the new policy is adopted, every opportunity should be taken to "accentuate the positive" in explaining it to the Library's clientele.
Admiral Hogan asked how the new policy would affect military personnel outside the country, who do not have libraries available through which they might ask for loans. Colonel Rogers stated that in these cases exceptions to the general rule would be made. Dr. Francis questioned the wording of the opening general statement of the proposed draft of the rules proper; various suggestions for improvement were offered. Admiral Hogan recommended that the action should not become effective until September 1.
Motion: Dr. Lyons moved that the recommendations of library administration for revising the mechanisms for offering loan services be approved by the Board. Dr. Ravdin seconded the motion. The action was put to a vote in carried.
Next Meeting
Agenda: presentation by Library's architects; discussion of policy of scope and coverage (background papers on this question were distributed).
Time of meeting: after discussion it was agreed that the next meeting of the Board of Regents would be held in Washington on Friday, June 7, at 2 p.m. lunch will be available at the Library before the meeting.
Future meetings. The Board will meet in the fall on September 23. Another meeting will probably be scheduled for sometime early in February.
(Whereupon the meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m.)
Frank B. Rogers
Secretary to the Board of Regents
National Library of Medicine
Attachments:
Tab A - Letter, Dr. Theobald to Chairman
Tab B - Letter, Mayor Daley to Chairman
Tab C - Letter, Chairman to Mayor Daley
Tab D - Sub-soil conditions
Tab E - Letter, Chairman to Surgeon General, PHS
Tab A
Medical Center Commission
Chicago 7, Illinois
Dr. Worth B. Daniels
Clinical Professor of Medicine
Georgetown University School of Medicine
Washington 7, D. C.
Dear Dr. Daniels:
On behalf of the members of the Medical Center Commission, I extend congratulations on your appointment as regent of the National Library of Medicine. Your appointment is of special significance because it brings this important project definitely nearer reality.
Chicago is conceded to be the medical capital of the country. This is due to the unique concentration of hospitals, professional schools and related institutions in the city. Here also are located the national headquarters of the American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association, the American College of Surgeons, the American Dental Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, and 35 other important medical organizations.
In the heart of Chicago is the 305-acre Medical Center District. Some of its prominent features are revealed in the enclosed brochure. The great hospitals, medical colleges and associated facilities established here make it unquestionably the foremost of all medical centers. More than 3,300 students are enrolled in its professional schools, and from 2,000 to 2,500 physicians come here each year for refresher courses or postgraduate studies. This unparalleled concentration of facilities for medical service, research and teaching, its accessibility to scientific personnel, and its unsurpassed location for transportation, distribution and communication, make the Medical Center District the ideal site for the new National Library of Medicine.
The Library's widespread service will be of immeasurable use not only to medical institutions and personnel in the rapidly growing Medical Center District, but throughout the great Midwest. For this reason, am pleased to tell you that the commission is ready to donate an 8-acre to your Board for this most worthy project.
Cordially yours,
Walter H. Theobald, M. D.
President
Tab B
Office of the Mayor
City of Chicago
April 17, 1957
Richard J. Daley, Mayor
Dr. Worth B. Daniels, Chairman
Board of Regents
National Library of Medicine
Georgetown University
Washington, D. C.
Dear Dr. Daniels:
It is my privilege to inform the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine that a committee of Chicagoans, on which was represented all of the professional and scientific groups interested in the selection of the site for a new National Library of Medicine building, appeared before a congressional commission to present reasons why the library should be erected in Chicago. At that meeting it was officially announced that the Medical Center Commission of Chicago and the University of Chicago each offered to United States Government, free from cost, the necessary land on which could be built the National Library of Medicine.
Prior to the meeting of your Board of Regents on March 20, 1957, I addressed a letter to President Eisenhower suggesting that when the Board was named they visit Chicago to inspect the sites which we had offered for the location of the Library.
A letter from Mr. Sherman Adams, dated April 8, 1957, informed us of the meeting of your Board on March 20, and expressed his opinion that she would be glad to receive any additional information or data concerning the Chicago site which we might care to offer.
I do not desire to burden the Board of Regents with material which I am sure would not add to the knowledge which is already theirs -- that Chicago in the heart of the United States is the medical center of the world. I am also sure that all of the members of the Board of Regents are members of some one or more of the dozens of national medical, dental and other scientific societies which are located in Chicago. It is reasonable to expect no additional evidence is needed to gain acceptance of the fact that the library located in Chicago would make its facilities and services available to the greatest possible number of those whom it is intended to serve.
We respectfully refer your Board to the records of the congressional hearings which clearly show that the interest of our country will best be served by the location of the library in Chicago.
May I extend to the board same invitation conveyed in my letter to President Eisenhower -- Come to Chicago and survey the sites we offer.
We will gladly furnish your Board with any information or data you may desire.
Sincerely,
Richard J. Daley
Mayor
Tab C
1150 Connecticut Ave.
Washington 6, D. C.
The Honorable Richard J. Daley
Mayor of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
My dear Mayor Daley:
Your letter of April 17, in regard to the National Library of Medicine, directed to me at the Georgetown University was delayed in arriving at my office.
Each member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine has been supplied with the transcript of the testimony given by prominent Chicago citizens and physicians before the Congressional Committees. The Regents have been informed that The Medical Center Commission of Chicago in the University of Chicago have offered, free from cost, the necessary land is a site for the National Library of Medicine. Members of the Board of Regents have received a letter from Dr. Theobald with a brochure "Report of the Medical Center Commission to the 70th General Assembly of Illinois".
As Chairman of the Board of Regents I have requested Dr. Ernest Volwiler, one of the Regents resident in Chicago, to report to the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine at its next meeting on April 29th on the land offered as a site for the Library. I have just talked by telephone with Dr. Volwiler was out of Chicago today. He hopes on his return midday Saturday, April 27th to communicate with Dr. Walter H. Theobald, President of the Medical Center Commission, and view the specific sites suggested by the Medical Center Commission. He tells me that he is already familiar with the general area of the site or sites so generously offered by Chicago. I will request Dr. Volwiler to report to the full membership of the Board of Regents at its meeting on April 29th, next.
I can assure you that the Regents are giving most serious thought to sites for the Library and careful consideration to the suggestion that the library be located in Chicago.
Thank you very much for your interest and for Chicago's generosity.
Sincerely yours,
Worth B. Daniels, M. D.
Chairman, Board of Regents
The National Library of Medicine
Tab D
National Library of Medicine
Washington, D. C.
April 25, 1957
Subsoil Characteristics for Three Washington Sites
Site - Source of Information - Facts- Comments
NNMC, Bethesda Jones Bridge Road - Navy Department - Borings made - site recommended by Navy. See Note A
NIH, Bethesda - GSA/PHS - Two borings made 30 ft. apart - site recommended by GSA see Note B
Soldiers' Home, S. E. Corner (Franklin Road and Michigan Avenue) 1. GSA/PHS - New hospital constructed 2,000 ft. W. F see Note C
Soldiers' Home, S. E. Corner (Franklin Road and Michigan Avenue) 2. D. C. Highway Engineer - Highway overpass constructed 700 ft. N. W. - Piles necessary
Notes
A. Due to the necessity of providing blast-resistant features for the basement and three sub-grade book stack floors, a site was chosen encompassing a large ravine. This factor greatly influenced the exact location of the building relative to the site. Underground rock contours were obtained by core borings and applied against the topography of the area. The building was that located so that a solid rock foundation would be provided with the most economical excavation. Under these conditions a balance of excavation and embankment quantities could not be attained in excess of excavation remains. (Advanced Planning Report, Part II)
B. At the site on S.E. section of NIH reservation two borings 30 ft. apart have been made. Hard rock was struck at 19 ft. in the first hole and at 25 ft. In the second. The rock is suitable for foundations and upon exposure to air will disintegrate to the extent that pneumatic drills and scoops can remove it. Thus the soil conditions are excellent for strong foundations and will not be excessively costly to dig for two floors below ground. There is no unusual water problem.
C. The quality of the subsoil at this site varied greatly. The foundations were designed partly for piles and partly for spread footings. The contractor requested and was permitted to substitute caissons for both piles and spread footings. Piles are caissons are more expensive to design and construct then concrete on rock.
Tab E
May 1, 1957
Dr. Leroy E. Bernie
The Surgeon General, Public Health Service
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Washington 25, D. C.
Dear Dr. Burney:
In accordance with section 376 of Part H, Title III, of the Public Health Service Act, which pertains to the National Library of Medicine, specify that "The Administrator of General Services is authorized to acquire, by purchase, condemnation, donation, or otherwise, a suitable site or sites, selected by the Surgeon General in accordance with the direction of the Board, for such buildings and facilities and to erect thereon, furnish, and equip such buildings and facilities," the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine herewith transmits to you its decision.
The Board of Regents, by unanimous vote, has decided that the site of the new building for the National Library of Medicine will be the southeast sector of the National Institutes of Health reservation in Bethesda, Maryland, provided that an area of not less than ten acres will be designated for the libraries use.
In reaching this decision the Board met in executive session twice, on March 20, 1957, and on April 29, 1957. The Board had available and has studied carefully complete transcripts of hearings held before the Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, United States Senate, April 10 and 11, 1956; hearings of the Subcommittee on Health and Science of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, June 11, 1956; the hearings of the Committee on House Administration, House of Representatives, June 19 and June 26, 1956. The Board has also studied the debate in the Senate as reported on pp. 8988-8996 of the Congressional Record for June 11, 1956, and the debate in the House as reported on pp. 12803-12805 of the Congressional Record for July 23, 1956.
Communications received by the Board of Regents from the two leading American organizations engaged in medical and dental education especially impressed the Board; the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Association of American Dental Schools have expressed themselves as favoring retention of the National Library of Medicine in the Washington area. Copies of these communications are enclosed.
The Board of Regents considered that the problem of site selection for the new building of the National Library of Medicine was approached most logically by successive attention to three major aspects. The first aspect was area selection, by which the Board means the flexion of the city or metropolitan area near or within which the Library will be located. The second aspect with site selection proper, which means the choosing of a particular region within the chosen metropolitan area. The third aspect with that of location selection, which means the choosing of specific acreage on the selected site.
In considering the first aspect, area selection, the Board believed that the area chosen must be within or near a fairly large city. This would assure an adequate transportation network, a large group of medical people with whom ideas could be interchanged, and from home consultation and stimulation could be obtained, and the population from which an adequate staff, with adequate language competencies, could be drawn.
The Board decided that the Library should be located in or near the city of Washington, D. C. The facts that major users of the Library are government agencies in the Washington area, that any move outside the area would disrupt patterns of service established for over a hundred years, and some replacement for this Library would need to be made should it be moved out of the area were major considerations. The Board also believed that the expense of moving the enormous collections of the Library any appreciable distance from its present location would not be justifiable; the money required would be better spent on facilities, materials, and services. Among many other factors considered, one which seemed quite prominent to the Board with the inevitable breaking up of the present staff of the Library, assembled and trained over the years, if the Library should be moved from Washington.
In the course of its deliberations the Board gave thoughtful consideration to other sites in various parts of the United States. The opinion of the Board, the facts outlined in the paragraph above heavily outweighed any advantage which might otherwise pertain to these areas.
On the matter of site proper, the Board considered that location of the Library adjacent to a medical center was a criterion of vast importance. The Board recalled the both the National Research Council Committee on the Army Medical Library, in 1951, and the Armed Forces Medical Library Advisory Group, in 1956, had attached the same high degree of importance to this point. The Board considered also the availability of land, transportation networks, space or parking and subsequent additions to stacks, and other matters. As to the general availability of suitable locations and given sites, the Board considered such matters as configuration of terrain, relationship with surrounding buildings, available at central heating connections, and similar elements.
The Board considered many possible sites in or near Washington. It was unanimous decision of the Board that the site chosen, on the grounds of the National Institutes of Health, is the most eminently suitable.
By resolution, the Board of Regents recommends that the highest priority be given to the obtaining of funds for construction of the new National Library of Medicine building at the earliest possible moment.
Sincerely yours,
Worth B. Daniels, M. D.
Chairman, Board of Regents
National Library of Medicine
Enclosures:
Letter, Association of American Medical Colleges, April 1, 1957
Letter, American Association of Dental Schools, April 4, 1957
Association of American Medical Colleges
2530 Ridge Avenue
Evanston, Illinois
April 1, 1957
Dr. Worth B. Daniels
1150 Connecticut Avenue
Washington 6, D. C.
My dear Dr. Daniels:
I have polled the members of the Executive Committee of the Association of American Medical Colleges and as a result I am authorized to tell you that, in the opinion of the Council, the National Library of Medicine should be located in Washington, D. C. It is our strong hope that the Board of Regents will take action consistent with this recommendation.
Yours very truly
Ward Darley, M. D.
American Association of Dental Schools
April 4, 1957
Dr. Worth B. Daniels, Chairman
Board of Regents
National Library for Medicine
1150 Connecticut Avenue
Washington 6, D. C.
Dear Dr. Daniels:
The American Association of Dental Schools, informal Session at Atlantic City, New Jersey, March 24-27, 1957, consider two proposals about the National Library of Medicine.
One proposal concerns the possible change in the location of the Library. It is the considered opinion of the Association that since the need for the Library, because of the many governmental facilities engaged in various medical and allied researches is more urgent in Washington, D. C. then in another city, the location of the Library should continue to be in Washington, D. C.
The other proposal concerns the name of the Library as established in Public Law 941, 84th Congress. Since the Library will service all health areas, rather than medicine alone, the Association, although recognizing that Section 375 covers the disciplines included in "medicine" feels that the name "National Library for Health Sciences" is more appropriate.
The Association hopes that Public Law 941 can be amended to provide for the change in name as suggested.
Yours very truly,
Marion W. McCrae, Sec.-Treas.
Am. Assoc. of Dental Schools
cc: Dr. Basil G. Bibby
Dr. Harold Hillenbrand
Dr. Roy G. Ellis
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