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The Alan Gregg Papers

Title:
Letter from Leonard Colebrook to Alan Gregg pdf (163,305 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Leonard Colebrook to Alan Gregg
Description:
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
4 (163,305 Bytes)
Date:
1957-02-17 (February 17, 1957)
Creator:
Colebrook, Leonard
Recipient:
Gregg, Alan
Rights:
Courtesy of Eleanor Gregg.
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Exhibit Category:
Director of Medical Sciences, 1930-1945
Box Number: 10
Folder Number: 5
Unique Identifier:
FSBBFB
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Transcript:
Feb 17 57
My dear Gregg
Many thanks for sending me your reprint on the Derailment of Reason in which I found very wise sayings. I am particularly glad I have Fisher's formula and your story of the 1500 flipped pennies. How right you are about the need for 'a course in evidence' for would-be doctors.
I hope you are now sitting in the sun writing on the Writing of medical literature.
You kindly ask me if you may send me Roger Lee's book. Sure you may and I shall be delighted to see it. I did not know he had written one. We wondered why we have not heard from them last Christmas. I must send him my little 'piece' on Fleming and enquire. Say the word if you would like me to send the book back. I now have some time for reading--at last--although even now not as much as I would like, what with gardening and house chores and all the silly bric a brac of daily life
[END PAGE ONE]
[BEGIN PAGE TWO]
I hope you will manage your retirement more wisely and enjoy it a lot.
I hope too that you will find your way over here and come and see us. We can show you a pleasant quiet corner of England (except in the skies--we have too many planes but we get used to them)
Talking of crossing the seas, I have just, very reluctantly, turned down an invitation (via Stuart Mudd) to come over next fall and speak to the American Public Health Assoc about infection in hospitals. I was very tempted--for the pleasure of seeing a few friends--but I decided that it would be foolish for an old man of 74 (and out of touch with medical affairs) to re-tell a story I have already told in print--and which younger men can do better. I have agreed to give one lecture here next summer on "Things not found in text books"--and then I am through.
Except for thinking (and possibly writing something?) about the distressing problem of old age--and the need (as I see it) that we should move towards some measure of 'death control' as
[END PAGE TWO]
[BEGIN PAGE THREE]
well as of birth control.
Ought we not to plan old age--and establish it as a human right for the aged to have a say in the disposal of their latter ends? Surely the weary business of waiting to die in old people's homes, mental institutions or in private homes (often unwanted) is not the best that can contrived?
But how difficult to write about!
I am one of the lucky ones--so far--in having good health--but Fleming was luckier still in going out like a snuffed candle at 73.
Back to your letter. I was of course very interested to hear that your colleagues did not all share your trust in me way back in 1930. I am not surprised for I had not done any first class work--and of course I realize that if [. . .] Protonsil had not come along in 1935, I should not have been able to repay your trust too well. However, it was enormously fortunate for me
[END PAGE THREE]
[BEGIN PAGE FOUR]
that you and Fletcher did have some confidence in me. I shall never forget that morning at Queen Charlotte's when you (and ? O'Brien) turned me inside out with your shrew questions. I suppose you saw that I had some "fire in my belly" for saving the mothers. I certainly had, but it looked pretty difficult in 1930. Thank you once again.
that you and Fletcher did have some confidence in me. I shall never forget that morning at Queen Charlotte's when you (and ? O'Brien) turned me inside out with your shrew questions. I suppose you saw that I had some "fire in my belly" for saving the mothers. I certainly had, but it looked pretty difficult in 1930. Thank you once again.
I apologize for the long screed in long hand. I have to struggle along without a secretary
With kindest regards
Leonard Colebrook
I wonder what is the origin of Big Sur? London I suppose?
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2008-04-28
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