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The Wilbur A. Sawyer Papers

Title:
Letter from Wilbur A. Sawyer to Margaret Sawyer pdf (115,210 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from Wilbur A. Sawyer to Margaret Sawyer
Description:
Dr. Sawyer traveled to Europe and England several times during the course of World War II, often with the U.S. Health Commission to Europe, a group of public health experts charged with assessing wartime public health problems and planning for their control. In this letter, he described how the war was changing everyday routines and priorities.
Item is handwritten.
Number of Image Pages:
2 (115,210 Bytes)
Date:
1940-04-13 (April 13, 1940)
Creator:
Sawyer, Wilbur A.
Recipient:
Sawyer, Margaret
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Public Health
Exhibit Category:
Controlling Disease during World War II, 1939-1944
Box Number: 2
Folder Number: 16
Unique Identifier:
LWBBMG
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: Correspondence, 1911-1995
SubSeries: Personal correspondence, 1911-1995
Folder: 1939-1941
Transcript:
13th of April [1940]
Dear Margaret,
Here we are in Brussells, Dr. Warren and I, ready for another day of interviews and visiting. We came here from Paris yesterday and shall return there to-morrow, as plane service between here and London has been interrupted. We expect to fly from Paris to London Monday morning. So far we have been able to follow out our program in full in spite of the events in Norway.
Yesterday, after calling in the Medical Adviser to the colonies about yellow fever research in Africa, we made a visit to Dr. Van den Berghe,
[END PAGE ONE]
[BEGIN PAGE TWO]
2
who read a paper on yellow fever at last summer's Congress for Microbiology in New York. He broke his leg recently in an automobile accident and has been laid up in his home. His wife is naturally much concerned with the possibility of sudden German invasion and the necessity of fleeing with two young children and a husband with a broken leg! There are few outward signs of the war here,--no blackouts no food restrictions. In France there are rules about the kinds of food you can eat on certain days, but you have plenty.
This morning we shall go to Antwerp to visit the School of Tropical Medicine of which Prof. Rodhain's is director, and
[END PAGE TWO]
[BEGIN PAGE THREE]
3
at noon we shall see the Minister of the Colonies.
I have written Peg, but I do not know whether she and Wallace have reached London yet. I hope to see them next week.
Dr. Warren is ready to start for the station, so I must stop.
With much love,
Wilbur
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2006-07-13
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