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The Harold Varmus Papers

Title:
Letter from George F. Vande Woude, National Institutes of Health to Harold Varmus pdf (46,205 Bytes) transcript of pdf
Letter from George F. Vande Woude, National Institutes of Health to Harold Varmus
Number of Image Pages:
1 (46,205 Bytes)
Date:
1980-06-27 (June 27, 1980)
Creator:
Vande Woude, George F.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Recipient:
Varmus, Harold
Source:
Original Repository: University of California, San Francisco. Archives and Special Collections. Harold E. Varmus Papers
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Terminology as Topic
Oncogenes
Exhibit Category:
Retroviruses and the Genetic Origins of Cancer, 1970-1993
Relation:
Metadata Record Letter from Harold Varmus to George F. Vande Woude, National Institutes of Health (July 22, 1980) pdf (49,777 Bytes) transcript of pdf
/ps/access/MVBBGW.pdf
Box Number: 2
Folder Number: 16
Unique Identifier:
MVBBGT
Document Type:
Letters (correspondence)
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Series: UCSF Collections
SubSeries: Collection Number MSS 84-25
SubSubSeries: Correspondence, 1971-1984
Folder: Oncology nomenclature, 1980-1981
Transcript:
June 27, 1980
Dear Harold:
I agree fully with the proposed names for transforming genes. There is a need, however, for a name to describe "transforming" inserts in general. At present we have onc, src, acquired, specific, etc. The onc is perhaps most suitable since it was originally suggested with gag, pol and env. However it is less then mellifluous, is often pronounced like an abbreviation of my aunts' husband and has an absurd inference when one wishes to refer to the normal cell counterpart as in c-onc (pronounced conch). A c inversion of onc to - con would be more suitable. I would like however, to propose - mal (malignant) as an alternative. It has several obvious advantages, and when tested on a number of our colleagues, has had a very favorable response. If you agree I would be willing to circulate this letter.
Sincerely & best wishes,
George F. Vande Woude, Ph.D.
Head, Virus Tumor Biochemistry
Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2012-03-12
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