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The C. Everett Koop Papers

Title:
[Remarks presented in a press conference announcing the Advertising Council's new campaign on AIDS and the importance of using a condom, New York City, New York] pdf (275,901 Bytes) transcript of pdf
[Remarks presented in a press conference announcing the Advertising Council's new campaign on AIDS and the importance of using a condom, New York City, New York]
Number of Image Pages:
6 (275,901 Bytes)
Date:
1988-09-27 (September 27, 1988)
Creator:
Koop, C. Everett
Rights:
This item is in the public domain. It may be used without permission.
Subject:
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Exhibit Category:
AIDS, the Surgeon General, and the Politics of Public Health
Relation:
Metadata Record [Remarks presented in a press conference announcing the Advertising Council's new campaign on AIDS and the importance of using a condom, New York City, New York] [Reminiscence] (2003) pdf (54,180 Bytes) ocr (1,405 Bytes)
/ps/access/QQBDNS.pdf
Folder Number:
1988 Sep 27
Unique Identifier:
QQBDNR
Document Type:
Speeches
Language:
English
Format:
application/pdf
image/tif
Physical Condition:
Good
Transcript:
Thank you, Ruth (Wooden, President of the Advertising Council).
I am pleased to participate in this press conference announcing the advertising council's new campaign on AIDS and the importance of using a condom when having sex, atlhough I wish we did not have to be here.
It is truly unfortunate that, with all of the information being made available to the American people in recent months about AIDS, we still have to launch such a massive public service campaign. I truly wish the American people had the sense to recognize the menace this disease poses to all of us and take the necessary precautions.
Unfortunately, the sexual lifestyles of our people have not changed enough even with all the information available to them, to deter the massive growth of the epidemic. Make no mistake about it -- this is a disease of unprecedented proportion in our society. All of our studies have lead us to that conclusion. The plain, simple truth is that if we don't start taking care of ourselves and protecting ourselves against this uncontrolled disease, it is going to kill us. It is high time we started using the word condom when we talk about AIDS. It's high time we recognize that the American people, many of them, are not following our advice to abstain from sex or to limit their sexual partners. It's high time we began to address the only option available to sexually-active Americans who choose to ignore the options of abstinence or selective partners.
The facts are these: there is no cure for AIDS; there is no vaccine for AIDS; almost 70 percent of the world's total cases are right here in the United States; almost 2 million people in this country are already infected with the disease and, within the next three years (by 1991), the cost of health and support services or AIDS patients in the United States alone will range between $8 million and $16 million.
It is critical to the survival of our society that we recognize the importance of dealing with this epidemic, not in a crisis atmosphere, although it is a crisis, but with calm realism that if we fail, to address the epidemic, many of our fellow Americans will die needlessly.
The disease cuts across all segments of society, all ethnic groups, all ages. It is not confined to one group or another as responsible individuals, we cannot turn our back on our fellow-citizens. We, in the medical profession must leave no lead unfollowed, no avenue unexplored. Yes, the communications industry must alert our people, over and over again, to the implications of this horrible disease, information, and awareness.
We are fighting this dreaded horror in the laboratory as best we can -- you must fight it on the airwaves and in print. You alone can arm our people with the only weapon they have -- information.
I recall bringing this critical problem to the advertising council more than a year ago and I am delighted that you have acted upon my call that you marshall the forces of advertising just as you have done so admirably throughout your existence to the great benefit of your fellow citizens. I now call on the nation's media to overcome your natural aversion to this forthright public service advertising and urge you to once again, as you have so diligently in the past, join with me and the ad council in this tremendous endeavor on behalf of our own people.
Dr. Robert Windom, Assistant Secretary for Health and I have shared this view for many years. Unfortunately, Bob could not joing us today except by videotape. Bob --
(Play tape of Dr. Windom)
Thank you. One of the true measures of the commitment of the ad council, and I hope of the media, is the strong support this campaign is receiving from the New York Times. To join me in urging the media to provide space and time to this vital campaign is Walt Mattson, president of the New York Times and Chairman of the Advertising Council.
Metadata Last Modified Date:
2008-08-28
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