Central Dogma of Molecular Biology


Title:
Central Dogma of Molecular Biology
Creator:
Crick, Francis, 1916-2004
Date:
8 August 1970
Description:
In this article Crick explained how his theory regarding the flow of genetic information in the cell, which he had introduced in 1957 as the "Central dogma" of molecular biology, was well able to accommodate recent findings by Howard Temin and David Baltimore that certain oncogenic RNA viruses direct synthesis of DNA in virus-infected cells, a process that came to be called reverse transcription. Contrary to the misconceptions of critics, Crick had not ruled out this form of residue-by-residue transfer of sequence information from RNA to DNA, although he expected it to be rare. (Indeed, it had not been shown to occur in cells other than those infected by viruses.) Moreover, the centerpiece of his theory, that sequential information used to synthesize proteins could not again flow out of proteins, was unaffected by Temin's findings.
Periodical:
Nature
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Rights:
Reproduced with permission of the Nature Publishing Group. and http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html
Genre:
Articles
Format:
Text
Extent:
3 pages
Language:
English
Legacy Source Citation:
Periodical. Crick, Francis. "Central Dogma of Molecular Biology." Nature 227, (8 August 1970): 561-563. Article. 3 Images.. Nature
Legacy ID:
SCBCCH
NLM ID:
101584582X430
Profiles Collection:
The Francis Crick Papers
Story Section:
Embryology and the Organization of DNA in Higher Organisms, 1966-1976